Featured Work: Brown Scroll Drawings

paper

The following pieces were drawn on brown Kraft paper with graphite and white charcoal.

Untitled-detail, 2013, graphite and  white charcoal on scroll
Untitled#3-detail, 2013, graphite and white charcoal on scroll, 30 inches x 15 feet
2-laurentoomer
His Portrait-#1-detail, 2011, graphite and white charcoal on scroll, 30 inches x 15 feet

The works on paper depict a person engulfed in a knitted like cocoon that spans the complete 15 foot-long scroll. Unsurprisingly, this paper is not archival. However, this impermanent  quality intrigues me. I am excited to chronicle how these pieces will change over time. Such is life, things change!

What is the best way to photograph art that long? Once I resolve this dilemma… I will show the full image on a future post!

1-laurentoomer_30inchesx50feet
His Portrait-#1-detail, 2011, graphite and white charcoal on scroll, 30 inches x 15 feet

As I drew this series of work, I began to reflect on the cartoon (a.k.a  cartone) sketches made during the renaissance period by artists, like Leonardo da Vinci  and Raphael (see below). Despite the quality of mark and tone depicted in the cartoon it was never intended to be seen as a finished work. In fact, these cartoon drawings were made to act like tracing paper, a means of transferring an image to the painting surface. Viewed as a tool, many of the cartoon images were damaged during the transfer process.

Cartoon Process:

One approach:  The cartoon was used like a stencil- thousands of tiny holes were pricked into the the outline of the drawing. Then, charcoal powder was “pounced” upon the cartoon- leaving an imprint on the painting surface.

Second approach:  the cartoon acted as transfer paper (carbon paper), the back of the image was covered with charcoal. Next the image was traced, leaving an imprint on the painting surface.

Leonardo da Vinci, The Virgin and Child with St Anne and St John the Baptist, c. 1499–1500 or c. 1506–8, charcoal, black and white chalk, on paper, 55.7 in × 41.2 in
Leonardo di ser Piero da Vinci, The Virgin and Child with St Anne and St John the Baptist, c. 1499–1500 or c. 1506–8, charcoal, black and white chalk, on paper, 55.7 in × 41.2 in
Raffaello (also: Raphael) Sanzio da Urbino, Auxiliary cartoon for the Head of a Young Apostle, c.1519-20, 375 x 278 mm
Raffaello (also: Raphael) Sanzio da Urbino, Auxiliary cartoon for the Head of a Young Apostle, c.1519-20, 375 x 278 mm

Beauty and art can exist anywhere- including inexpensive paper, expensive paper, a cartoon, a leaf,…etc.!  It can circuit everything and everyone who is open to such an experience.

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